Grinflation.com

Price: $0.046 - 72 sats

Supply: 165,913,200

Market Cap: $7,685,099
119

Block Time: 1 minute
Block Reward: 60 GRIN

--- GRIN ツ EMISSION ---

1 Second 1 ツ $0.046
1 Minute 60 ツ $2.78
1 Hour 3,600 ツ $167
1 Day 86,400 ツ $4,002
1 Week 604,800 ツ $28,014
1 Month ~2,592,000 ツ $120,061
1 Year 31,557,600 ツ $1,461,748


GRIN Inflation Rate: 19.02%

Year Supply Inflation%
2019 0 inf
2020 31,557,600 100.0
2021 63,115,200 50.0
2022 94,672,800 33.3
2023 126,230,400 25.0
2024 157,788,000 20.0
2025 189,345,600 16.7
2026 220,903,200 14.3
2027 252,460,800 12.5
2028 284,018,400 11.1
2029 315,576,000 10.0
2030 347,133,600 9.1
2031 378,691,200 8.3
2032 410,248,800 7.7
2033 441,806,400 7.1
2034 473,364,000 6.7
2035 504,921,600 6.3
2036 536,479,200 5.9
2037 568,036,800 5.6
2038 599,594,400 5.3
2039 631,152,000 5.0
2040 662,709,600 4.8

* 1 Year is calculated as 365 days and 6 hours.




What is GRIN?

Grin is a minimalistic, lightweight cryptocurrency, implementing the Mimblewimble protocol for a unique balance of privacy and scalability. The chain has no addresses, no amounts, and no need to store data of spent outputs.

Grin is fully open-source and community-driven. There is no single entity behind it, Grin’s development is funded by donations as well as done voluntarily by contributors. Everybody can discuss, influence, or work on its development.

Grin’s blocktime is 1 minute, each with a coinbase reward of 60 grins, thus creating 1 unit per second, forever. This linear emission creates a constant increase in supply, but a decreasing rate of inflation; making the emission disinflationary. This simple design serves to ensure both the long term security of the chain and a fair process of coin distribution to all participants.

In Aug 2016, an anonymous person using the nickname ‘majorplayer’, signed onto a Bitcoin research IRC channel, dropped a link to a document, then signed out. The document titled ‘Mimblewimble’ was authored under the pseudonym Tom Elvis Jedusor. Several developers took an interest, one of them being Andrew Poelstra, who later published a paper which added several refinements and a detailed technical description of the original whitepaper.

In Oct 2016, a developer under the pseudonym Ignotus Peverell began work on developing an implementation of the protocol and was soon joined by others in an effort to build the project which ultimately came to be known as Grin. It was launched on January 15th, 2019.



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